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Travel

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Brexit will mean some changes to rules and processes around travel, but with a bit of forward-planning islanders will put themselves in the best possible position to have a disruption-free trip.

Travel

 

  • Passports

    • Until the United Kingdom leaves the European Union, passports issued in Guernsey will still reference the European Union.  After Brexit, passports issued in Guernsey will have a similar design to new passports issued in the UK and will be different from passports issued to EU citizens.
    • You will not need a passport (though you will still need a form of photographic identification) to travel between the Channel Islands and the UK, but the rules for travel to most other countries in Europe will change if the UK leaves the EU with no deal. The new rules will apply to people holding passports issued by the UK, its Overseas Territories and Gibraltar, as well as the Bailiwick of Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man.
    • After Brexit, the expiry date on your passport must be at least six months after the date you arrive in the country you are visiting. This applies to adult and child passports. If you renewed your passport before it expired, extra months might have been added to your new passport's expiry date. Any extra months on your passport over 10 years might not count towards the six months that must be remaining for travel to most countries in Europe.
    • The new rules will apply for travel to and between countries in the Schengen area. You can find a list of the 26 Schengen countries here.
    • If your passport or your child's passport does not meet the new rules on the day you plan to arrive in any of these countries, you should renew the passport before you travel. You should apply to renew your passport or your child's passport at least eight weeks before you plan to travel to make sure you have it in time for your trip. Please don't delay - we don't want you to have to change your travel plans. 
    • You can still use our fast-track passport application service if you need a passport quickly. The premium service takes up to eight working days and costs £142 for an adult and £122 for a child.
  • Passport checker

    • There is a Passport Validity Checker on the UK Government's website to help you check that your passport is valid for travel in Europe. If you are still worried that your passport might not be valid for travel in Europe you can email Guernsey's Passport Office at passports@gba.gov.gg or call 01481 741410 for advice.
  • Travel to EU countries not in the Schengen area

    • The new rules will not apply when travelling to the Republic of Ireland because it forms part of the Common Travel Area (CTA).  All parties to the CTA (UK, Ireland and the Crown Dependencies) have confirmed their intention to maintain those arrangements, even in the event of a no deal Brexit.
    • Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus and Romania are not in the Schengen area. You can check the entry requirements for these countries on the UK Government's website.
  • Travel to countries outside the EU

    • The rules for British passport holders travelling to countries outside the EU will not change because of Brexit. You can check the rules for each country you want to visit on the UK Government's website.
  • Travel by air

    • Flying between Guernsey and the UK
    • We expect flights between Guernsey and the UK to continue to operate as they do today.   We don't expect there to be any significant issues for passengers holding 'Schengen' compliant British passports, including those issued in Guernsey, Jersey, and the Isle of Man. 
    • Flying between Guernsey and Europe
    • We expect flights between Guernsey and Europe to continue to operate as they do today.  We don't expect there to be any significant issues for passengers holding 'Schengen' compliant British passports, including those issued in Guernsey, Jersey, and the Isle of Man for travel into the EU Member States. However, there might be delays at Member State Immigration controls due to additional 'third country' checks.  Please check online before you travel for the latest travel information and scheduled services from your airline.
    • Flying outside of Europe
    • We expect flights to countries outside of Europe to operate as they do today. Please check the immigration rules for the country you are flying to.
  • Travel by sea

    • Portsmouth
    • There might be some disruption to passenger ferry sailings to/from Portsmouth if there is wider transport congestion around the port.  The UK are putting plans in place to minimise the level of disruption around UK ports. We are working in conjunction with ferry operators, logistical companies, the UK Government and UK authorities in order to keep the disruption levels at Portsmouth under review.
    • Poole
    • We are not expecting there to be any disruption to passenger ferry sailings to/from Poole.
    • St Malo
    • Should there be any disruption to ferry services between Guernsey and St Malo, this is likely to be short-term and as a result of logistical factors at UK and EU ports that have a knock-on impact to ferry operations and schedules. Please check online before you travel for the latest travel information and scheduled services from your ferry operator.
  • Driving in the EU

    • In December 2018, the States of Guernsey agreed to seek extension of the Vienna Convention on Road Transport to help guarantee the freedom to drive in the EU. This will help Guernsey drivers and vehicles looking to travel within the EU. As a result, there are additional insurance requirements (Green Card) for Guernsey vehicles and drivers using EU road networks. Please contact your insurance providers well in advance of your planned trip to Europe, if you intend to drive a vehicle.
    • Using your Guernsey-registered vehicle in the EU
    • The Committee for the Environment & Infrastructure is working towards ensuring that Guernsey-registered vehicles are compliant with EU regulations and standards.  The compliance requirements which are being introduced in a phased approach relate to ensuring that Guernsey vehicles meet the relevant safety standards. This includes evidencing the vehicle has undergone an approved period test inspection ('PTI') (commonly referred to as MoT) and the introduction of the requirement for the fitting and wearing of seatbelts in the rear of vehicles.
    • More information is available by visiting https://gov.gg/drivingabroad
  • Driving licences and International Driving Permits

    • Using your Guernsey driving licence in the EU
    • The Committee for the Environment & Infrastructure is working towards ensuring that Guernsey-issued driving licences are compliant with EU regulations and standards. Once the UK leaves the EU, it will be necessary for islanders intending to drive in certain EU Member States to apply for an International Driving Permit.
    • International Driving Permit
    • An International Driving Permit (IDP) is a translation of your driving entitlement that guarantees the ability to drive abroard if carried together with a domestic-issued driving licence. As from 31st October 2019, an IDP will be issued for driving in Liechtenstein, Spain, Iceland, Malta, Cyprus, Norway and all other EU countries. In some cases you may need more than one IDP if travelling through multiple countries.
    • You can get an IDP from the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Office at Bulwer Avenue. The application form can be downloaded at www.gov.gg/drivingabroad. For each application you will be required to produce: A completed and signed application form, a passport-sized photo (two if requesting two IDPs), and payment of £13 per IDP.
  • Pet Travel Scheme

    • Cats, dogs and ferrets
    • You will still be able to travel to Europe with your pet but the UK Government is discussing with the EU how it can still be included in the PET travel scheme.  Depending on the outcome of those discussions, you might need to take additional steps to be able to travel with your pet to the EU. 
    • You will need to make sure that your pet is vaccinated against rabies before they travel.  This means they will need to have an up-to-date rabies vaccination and a blood test to prove they have the right levels of rabies antibody.  The blood test needs to be carried out at least 30 days after any initial rabies vaccination and at least three months before their travel date.  Your pets will need to have vet health certification within 10 days of travel.
    • We recommend that you contact your vet at least four months before your planned travel date to check what you need to do.
    • Pet cats, dogs, and ferrets will still need to enter the EU by a Travellers' Point of Entry - which includes the main ports of arrival from the Bailiwick to France. The rules for pets returning to Guernsey or the UK from the EU will not change.
    • For more information, please read guidance from Defra (the UK Government's Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs) that also applies for Guernsey.
    • Horses
    • The UK Government is still discussing with the EU what the new rules will be for horses travelling into Europe, for example for competition, breeding, or treatment.  One of the most significant issues is likely to be that at the moment, there are no ports on the EU's Channel coast that are designated as Equine Border Inspection Posts. We will provide updated information once the UK Government and the EU have come to a decision about the new rules. 
    • Endangered species
    • The trade in CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) goods is diverse, ranging from live animals and plants to a vast array of wildlife products derived from them, including food products, exotic leather goods, wooden musical instruments, timber, tourist curios and medicines.  Levels of exploitation of some animal and plant species are high and the trade in them, together with other factors, such as habitat loss, is capable of heavily depleting their populations and even bringing some species close to extinction.  Many wildlife species in trade are not endangered, but the existence of an agreement to ensure the sustainability of the trade is important in order to safeguard these resources for the future.
    • There will be no changes to the rules for the movement of endangered species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species ("CITES"). Please click here for more information if you would like to import or export a product which is referred to as a 'CITES good'.

 

 

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